EGRP News Flash - July 29, 2008

BSA Approves RFA Concepts for Post-Genome Wide Association Research

On June 23, 2008 the National Cancer Institute's Board of Scientific Advisors (BSA) approved two concepts developed by EGRP staff for Requests for Applications (RFA). The concepts, described in greater detail below, are:

  • Transdisciplinary Cancer Genomics Research: Translation for Genome-Wide Association Studies
  • Replication and Fine-Mapping Studies for the Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative (GEI)

Transdisciplinary Cancer Genomics Research: Translation for Genome-Wide Association Studies

This RFA would solicit collaborative, transdisciplinary research projects pursued by multi-center teams of epidemiologists and basic scientists to investigate the significance of genomic regions reported to be associated with susceptibility for cancers of the colon, breast, prostate, lung, pancreas, bladder, and melanoma. The overall goals of this RFA are: (1) to exploit the power of existing GWAS of cancer by combining previously generated "initial scan" data and (2) to accelerate and coordinate integrative post-GWAS research. It is expected that researchers will make genotype, phenotype, and exposure data publicly available through NCI's cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG). The RFA, was approved for a first-year set-aside of $24 million for five to eight awards, for an estimated $96 million total over four years. Please direct questions about this RFA to Elizabeth Gillanders, Ph.D., Program Director, Host Susceptibility Factors Branch or Daniela Seminara, Ph.D., M.P.H., Scientific Consortia Coordinator and Program Director, Office of the Associate Director.

Replication and Fine-Mapping Studies for the Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative (GEI)

The purpose of this RFA is to provide support for replication and fine-mapping studies of genetic regions putatively associated with common complex traits (primarily identified by GWAS), with the aim of enhancing the identification of causal variants influencing complex diseases. Acceptable phenotypes need not be cancer-related. The concept was approved for $2 million for five awards over one year. The GEI initiative is a four-year NIH-wide program designed to identify major genetic susceptibility factors for diseases with a substantial public health impact and to develop technologies for reliable and reproducible measurement of potentially causative environmental exposures. Please direct questions about this RFA to Elizabeth Gillanders, Ph.D., (lgilland@mail.nih.gov).

When additional information is available (including timelines and links to official NIH notices) pertaining to the concepts described above, it will be shared via EGRP's listserv.

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