Workshop to Facilitate Cancer Systems Epidemiology Research

Workshop to Facilitate Cancer Systems Epidemiology Research, February 28 – March 1, 2019, Bethesda, MD


Overview

The availability of high throughput -omic technologies, novel devices for exposure assessment, and electronic medical records have the potential to facilitate a more comprehensive study of risk factors contributing to development of and outcomes from cancer.

Despite individual successes at identifying genetic, biological, and environmental risk factors for cancer, much of the etiology remains unexplained. This may be due in part to the limited focus of many studies on a single or small set of risk factors or data types (i.e. measures such as DNA sequence, methylation data, variables from questionnaires). Moreover, many studies fail to consider the complexities and interrelations among multiple risk factors and associated outcomes. For example, each individual risk factor, such as a single dietary component or genetic polymorphism, occurs in a broader biological (e.g. pathways) or societal (e.g. individual in social network) context which could modulate the effect of individual risk factors on disease. Further, many risk factors for disease can be highly correlated with possible interactive, synergistic, or attenuating effects. Importantly, risk factors can change over time.

A more comprehensive, systems modeling based type of approach, which accounts for multiple dimensions, integration of diverse data types, and changes over time, is needed to better understand contributors to disease and treatment outcomes and provide clues for improved intervention.

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Purpose

The objective of this workshop is to facilitate interdisciplinary discussion about the application of systems modeling approaches for population-based cancer epidemiology research. By bringing together scientists from various fields that use systems modeling the workshop aims to:

  • Identify ideas and strategies to improve understanding of systems modeling among population scientists and epidemiology amongst modelers;
  • Share lessons learned in the application of systems approaches from other fields (e.g. cancer biology)
  • Identify of potential high-impact use cases for systems modeling in population science;
  • Increase understanding of potential barriers and facilitators to taking a system modeling approach in population science (including dataset availabilities, data and methods needs)
  • Establish new collaborative interdisciplinary relationships between statisticians, mathematicians, computer scientists, bioinformaticians, epidemiologists, and clinicians.

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Draft Agenda

View agenda for February 28, 2019
Thursday, February 28 Topic
9:00 a.m. Welcome
9:15 a.m. Introduction to the Meeting
9:30 a.m. State of the Science
9:30 a.m.      Systems Epidemiology: Definitions, Applications, and Common Misconceptions
10:00 a.m.      Systems Epidemiology: What is in a Name?
10:30 a.m. Break
10:50 a.m. Successes and Challenges in Systems/Computational Modeling
10:50 a.m.

     National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR)

     Connection of Molecular Phenotypes and Population Data

     Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET)

     Modeling Cancer Risk in Population:  Building a Synthetic Cohort

     Models of Cancer Outcomes:  Synthetic Data Based on SEER Population

12:30 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m. Successes and Challenges in Systems/Computational Modeling (Continued)
1:30 p.m.

     Integration of Existing Genomic Resources with Epidemiological Research

     Modeling Place and Space

     Considerations for Interoperability

2:30 p.m. Perspectives: What is the Understanding and Ideal Future for Modeling in Epidemiological Studies? (Panel Discussion)
3:30 p.m. Break
3:50 p.m. Charge for the Break Out Sessions
4:20 p.m. Discussion Sessions (Round 1)
Group 1:  Facilitators and Barriers to Success
Group 2:  Opportunities for Systems Epidemiology
Group 3:  Approaches and Methods
Group 4:  Data Availability

5:20 p.m. Adjourn

View agenda for March 1, 2019
Friday, March 1 Topic
9:00 a.m. Introduction and Charge for Day 2
9:15 a.m. Integration of -Omics Data, Biobanks, and Electronic Medical Records
9:45 a.m. Dissemination and Implementation of Systems Modeling: How can these methods be applied? How can methods be interpreted and translated?
10:45 a.m. Discussion Sessions (Round 2)
Group 1:  Facilitators and Barriers to Success
Group 2:  Opportunities for Systems Epidemiology
Group 3:  Approaches and Methods
Group 4:  Data Availability

11:15 a.m. Break
11:45 a.m. Report Back and Group Discussion for Each Topic Discussion Sessions (Round 2)
Group 1:  Facilitators and Barriers to Success
Group 2:  Opportunities for Systems Epidemiology
Group 3:  Approaches and Methods
Group 4:  Data Availability

12:45 p.m. Next Steps and Action Items
1:00 p.m. Adjourn

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Registration

Registration to participate in this workshop in person is not yet open. Please bookmark this website and check back at a later date for more information.

This Workshop will also be broadcast via webex. Registration is not required for remote participation. To view the Workshop via webex on February 28 and/or March 1, go to https://cbiit.webex.com/cbiit/j.php?MTID=m3a7beb894ab6d33940dde47f552bc0a6External Web Site Policy.

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Planning Committee

NCI Staff

External Members

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Contact for Questions

  • Rolando Barajas, M.P.H., Cancer Research Training Award Fellow, Genomic Epidemiology Branch, EGRP, DCCPS, NCI

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